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Procedures and Guidelines

Hardware and Software Deployment

Policy Code: 3220 Technology in the Educational Program
The board strives to incorporate the use of technological resources into the educational program in order to enhance instructional opportunities, appeal to different learning styles and meet the educational goals of the board.
Schools are encouraged to develop strategies for using technological resources to improve student success. The strategies should be included in the school improvement plan if they require the transfer of funds or otherwise relate to any mandatory or optional components of the school improvement plan.

The superintendent shall develop a local school system technology plan that is aligned with and meets state requirements and submit the plan to the board for approval. The superintendent shall incorporate this plan into school system strategic planning efforts and shall include various stakeholders such as curriculum leaders, teachers, administrators, representatives from technology services and instructional technology, finance and other departments as required. Once the board has approved the plan, the superintendent shall take all steps necessary to receive approval of the plan from the State Board of Education. No state funds may be spent on any aspect of school technology except in accordance with the technology plan.

The superintendent shall establish relationships with businesses and seek grants and other funding sources in an effort to acquire technological resources for the educational program.

A. SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

All technological resources, including computers, software and communication lines, must be purchased and used in a manner consistent with applicable law and board policy, including laws and policies related to copyright, public records, bidding and other purchase requirements, staff duties and standards for student behavior.

Technological resources must meet or exceed the following standards before they may be considered for implementation.

1. Technological resources must relate to or help to implement the North Carolina Standard Course of Study or the programs of the school system.

2. Technological resources must relate to the current use of learning and instructional management technologies in the school.

3. Technological resources must be compatible with the condition of the network. The technology director shall set minimum standards for technological resources that are purchased or donated. Upgrading, hardware conditions and similar requirements must be maintained to the highest standards.

4. There must be sufficient staff to operate and maintain the technological equipment, programs and systems.

5. There must be adequate funds budgeted to implement and support the technological resources.

B. DEPLOYMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO SCHOOLS

The superintendent shall oversee the development of the school system’s technology deployment plan. The plan will be designed to ensure organized, effective and efficient means of deploying new hardware and software. The superintendent shall develop procedures that outline the strategy of the technology deployment plan.

C. TRAINING FOR USE OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

Users should be trained as necessary in the effective use of technological resources. Such training should include information related to remote access, virus protection, NC WISE, network and information security, and other topics deemed necessary by the superintendent or technology director. School improvement teams should identify any staff development appropriations for technological training in their school improvement plans. The superintendent and technology director should assist schools in coordinating staff development needs as provided in policy 1610/7800, Professional and Staff Development.

Legal References: G.S. 115C-102.6C, -522; 147-33.111; State Board of Education Policy TCS-C-018
Cross References: Professional and Staff Development (policy 1610/7800), Technology Acceptable Use (policy 3225/4312/7320), Copyright Compliance (policy 3230/7330), School Improvement Plan (policy 3430), Integrity and Civility (policy 4310), Public Records – Retention, Release and Disposition (policy 5070/7350), Network Security (policy 6524), Staff Responsibilities (policy 7300), Gifts and Bequests (policy 8220)
Adopted: May 10, 2011

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF ROBESON COUNTY

Equipment Maintenance and Repairs

I. Overview

In the world of rapidly changing technologies, the value of making repairs on older equipment and systems must be evaluated. Our strategic priority of effective and efficient operations is inclusive in the realm of wise use of limited funds. Our objective is to expend limited repair funds on equipment that continues to have a significant remaining useful life in our educational environment.

The PSRC Technology Department acknowledges that the need for specific equipment is often considered vital for specific administrative and/or instructional programs. Efforts will be made to find replacement equipment that supports these applications.

II. Repair initiatives will adhere to the following guidelines:

Categories: Equipment will be categorized for evaluation for suitability of repairs. These categories are:

  • Warranty
  • Repair
  • No repair
  • Supplies

Warranty: Efforts are made to ensure that equipment is maintained under manufacture warranty as long as is cost effective.

Repair Cost Limit: Decision for repair will be based on the estimated cost of repairs. Repair cost may not exceed 30% of the cost of replacement hardware. Guidelines for categories of equipment and the guidelines that apply to those items are included in this paper. A $200 limit on repairs exists for non-computer technology equipment.

No repair: No guarantees exist that non-repairable equipment will be replaced.

Supplies: Components that wear out over time (i.e., mice, keyboards, toner cartridges) will be treated as supplies. Replacement for supplies is the responsibility of individual schools.

Non-repair decisions: If a decision for no repair (because of cost) is made by the technology department, a school or department may choose to have repaired through its own funds. However, PSRC Technology Department funds will not be available to support the repair.

Repair options: All hardware must be repaired by the PSRC Technology Department or an approved/authorized PSRC vendor.

Hardware Repair Guideline Categories

(Guidelines will be reviewed annually)

Category/DescriptionComments
Warranty: Equipment that is currently under a manufacturer’s warranty.All new equipment purchases must meet PSRC hardware standards.New equipment (CPU’s and laptops) must be purchased with a 3-year warranty.
Repair: Equipment that is in good condition and does not have excessive wear (purchased within 4 years)No repair will be authorized if repair cost exceeds repair cost limitation. (30% of cost of new equipment.A school or department may choose to pay for specific repairs from its funds.PSRC Technology Department may choose to replace some equipment rather than repair. (i.e. Replacement of monitors is usually more cost effective than repair.)
Repair cost limit: Older equipment still considered worthy of minor repairs to continue its usability in the classroom or office.Repairs will occur only if the cost is less than $200.Equipment may not be rebuilt by sending it for repair multiple times—thus fixing, one piece at a time.
No repair: Obsolete, worn out equipmentThis equipment will not be repaired.Equipment may still be useful, and the school or department may still choose have repaired through its own funds.
Supplies: Items expected to be worn out or used up (mice, keyboards, toner cartridges)Schools or departments should purchase these as needed.
Outdated Resources and Equipment Replacement

DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PROPERTY Policy Code: 6560

When personal property becomes unnecessary and undesirable for public school purposes, the school system will sell or dispose of the property in order to provide additional revenue for educational purposes, in accordance with the requirements of G.S. 115C-518 and G.S. 160A, article 12. Before any property may be sold or disposed of, it must be removed from the appropriate fixed asset inventory.

The superintendent or designee shall ensure that any confidential, proprietary or other identifying information is removed from surplus property prior to disposition. In addition, the disposal of any equipment or other property through waste management services must be done in a manner consistent with environmental or other relevant rules and regulations.

A.Property Worth Less than $30,000

Pursuant to G.S. 160A-266(c), the board permits the superintendent or designee to dispose of personal property, the property's fair market value; and to convey title to the property for the board of education. Prior to disposition, the superintendent or designee must make a finding that the property is no longer necessary or desirable for school use.

For property worth $________ to $________, the superintendent or designee shall determine and recommend to the board of education whether or not items or groups of similar items are unnecessary or undesirable for school purposes. The recommendation must include the description of the items or the groups of items and a recommended method of sale or disposition.

Property covered by this section may be disposed of through a public or private exchange or sale. Pursuant to G.S. 160A-270(c), the board delegates to the superintendent or designee the authority to conduct electronic auctions of surplus property. The superintendent or designee shall choose or recommend a method of disposal that is designed to obtain a fair market value for the property in the most efficient and economical manner possible and is in the best interest of the school system, as determined by the superintendent or designee.

The superintendent shall provide a semiannual report to the board detailing such transactions. The report must include: (1) a general description of the property sold or exchanged; (2) the name of the person(s) to whom the property was sold or with whom it was exchanged; and (3) the amount of money or other consideration received for each sale or exchange.

B.Property Worth $30,000 or More

Property worth at least $30,000 will be disposed of pursuant to the requirements of G.S. 160A, article 12.

Legal References: G.S. 115C-518; 160A, art. 12

Cross References: Inventory of Fixed Assets (policy 8350)

Adopted: November 8, 2011

Disaster Recovery of Data and Hardware

PSRC Disaster Recovery of Data and Hardware Procedure

I. Overview

A Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP) involves more than off-site storage or backup processing. The DRP is a written, comprehensive disaster recovery plan that addresses all the critical operations and functions of this school system. The plan includes procedures, which, if followed, will ensure the ongoing availability of critical resources and continuity of operations.

The PSRC Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP) addresses a process for the recovery of both data and hardware and also addresses all critical operations should a disaster occur in the Public Schools of Robeson County. The plan is designed to minimize the impact of “down-time,” and to ensure that necessary operational functions will be available for use in the least amount of time. Such operations include access to the following:

instructional materials

financial information

student information management systems

testing and accountability information

personnel information

data records

Commitment of all system personnel is necessary in order for a DRP to ensure successful recovery of data and hardware systems with the least amount of inoperable time.

II. Objectives

Additional objectives of the DRP include:

Maintaining instructional options for the classroom with little or no interruption

Providing a sense of security

Minimizing risk of delays in services

Guaranteeing reliability of standby systems

Providing a standard for testing the plan

Minimizing decision-making during a disaster

Reducing the probability of such an occurrence

Reducing disruptions to operations

Ensuring organizational stability

Providing an orderly recovery

Reducing reliance on certain key individuals

Protecting the assets of the organization

Ensuring the confidentiality of information

III. Committee

A committee to oversee the implementation of the disaster recovery plan will be comprised of a representative from the PSRC Technology Department, the Financial Services Department, Plant Operations Department, and a principal’s designee at each school.

IV. Departments—Critical needs

Critical needs are defined as the necessary procedures and equipment required to continue operations should a department, computer center, main facility or a combination of these be destroyed or become inaccessible. An evaluation for each department/school containing the following items is needed.

critical operations

current location of critical data/information

key personnel information

key systems for operation

needed documentation for preservation

vital records

policies and procedures

key data centers

V. Recovery Strategies

The most practical alternatives for processing in case of a disaster include consideration of all aspects of our organization. These aspects include, but are not limited to:

Facilities

Hardware

Software

Communications

Data files

Customer services

User operations

MIS

End-user systems

Other processing operations

VI. Data Collection

Documentation and data gathering materials for each department/school will be maintained a copy within the school/department and a copy at the district office. Documentation and data information includes:

Backup position listing

Critical telephone numbers

Communications inventory

Distribution register

Documentation inventory

Equipment inventory

Forms inventory

Insurance policy inventory

Main computer hardware inventory

Master call list

Master vendor list

Microcomputer hardware and software inventory

Notification checklist

Office supply inventory

Off-site storage location inventory

Software and data files backup/retention schedules

Telephone inventory

Temporary location specifications

Others materials and documentation


VII. Backup Protection

The IT Department continues to investigate better methods for backup/protection of information. With consideration for expense, “spare” equipment is kept available.

VIII.Procedure

In the event of infrastructure and/or server failure, plans for restoring computing and network facilities for the Public Schools of Robeson County are outlined below. This plan lists those measures that are in place to assist in such a recovery, as well as the actual steps taken after the disaster to begin the restoration process.

Restoration Process

Technology Director is contacted with the report of the network disaster.

Technology Director directs appropriate personnel to conduct damage assessments and construct a priority list for restoration/ recovery.

Technology Directory and other appropriate personnel use the priority list to develop a strategic plan for network recovery.

Director will keep the Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent informed of findings and plan for recovery.

Suggested prioritization of network components:

Highest priority – network backbone (firewall, switches, wiring components, main servers that contain critical operational data)

Medium priority – web server, web filter, email server, network print services, desktop computer of critical personnel

Low priority – instructional computer labs, desktop computers and individual peripherals

Administration of Online Courses

PSRC Procedures for Administration of Online Courses to Students

Online Courses administered in the Public Schools of Robeson County must adhere to the following procedures and guidelines.

Online Course Offerings

1.The online course(s) must be approved by the North Carolina State Board of Education and will be 
provided by the North Carolina Virtual Public School (NCVPS – http://www.ncvps.org) and Learn and Earn Online.

2.All students taking an online course must have a signed Acceptable Use Policy on file at their school site.

3.All students taking online courses must acquire the “Student Registration Procedure” form available from their local school, complete the form, and secure all required signatures and permissions.

4.All students taking online courses must acquire the “Public Schools of Robeson County Request to Enroll for a Course Offered at an Institution Other Than the Student’s Assigned (Home) High School” form available from their local school, complete the form, and secure all required signatures and permissions.

Online Course Curriculum

1.Online courses must be aligned with North Carolina state standards for student learning.

2.Student learning goals (objectives) shall be clearly stated and aligned to the North Carolina Common Core and/or Essential Standards for that course.

3.Online course descriptions shall be made available to parents and students prior to registration through the PSRC, North Carolina Virtual Public School, and/or Learn and Earn Online websites.

Online Course Participants

1.Students wishing to take an online course must be put through a screening process to ensure that the required level of skills, motivation, and commitment to learn online are present.

2.Students and parents/guardians may be responsible for any/all costs to the school/district if he/she drops the online course after the course drop deadline.

3.Students participating in an online course are responsible for keeping up with course assignments, deadlines, etc. and completion of the course.

4.Students participating in online courses shall be provided with access to online teachers, counseling, guidance, and NCVPS Advisors/LEO Facilitators for the duration of the course.

5.Grading for online courses will follow the PSRC Grading Policy.

6.Weighting of Online Courses will be determined by the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction, while adhering to any/all state guidelines.

Online Course Management and Support

1.School sites wishing to offer online courses to students must have a dedicated classroom or lab 
with a modern computer and Internet connection for each participant or else permit students to take online courses at home.

2.Multiple online courses may be offered during the same class period.

3.LEA will determine how many online courses a student make take during a semester.

4.If the LEA is following a block and semester schedule and the online course being taken is a year-long course, provisions must be made for obtaining other credits.

5.If the LEA is following a block schedule and the online course being taken is a year-long course, provisions must be made at the school site for the students taking the online course for the remainder of the block period.

6.Students taking online courses at school will log in to the network with a user name and password in order to secure their work. Students are not to share their user name or passwords with others.

7.All students taking online courses at school must have equal access to computers, Internet connections, and other resources necessary for taking an online course.

8.It is the responsibility of the local school to provide any/all additional resources (ie. Textbooks or Software) required for online courses.

Technical Support and Infrastructure

1.The LEA technology plan shall address the delivery of online courses.

2.Technical support from the NCVPS Help Desk and PSRC Help Desk via email and telephone shall be available if/when needed for online courses.

3.Technical support from site system operators and/or Technology Support Services shall be available if/when needed for online courses taken at school.

4.The appropriate level of technology needed for online courses shall be available to students at all sites administering online courses.

5. Each school site must make provisions for meeting the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) when offering online courses to disabled students.

Administration of Online Assessment

The Public Schools of Robeson County will follow the guidelines and procedures established by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Accountability Division for all online assessments.

Policy Translation

Policy Code: 4003 Translating Policies for Students and Parents

The board recognizes that there are many students and parents in the school system for whom English is a second language. The board further recognizes the importance of communicating the policies of the school system to all students and parents. As funds permit, to the extent practicable, and as otherwise required by law, the school system will provide translations of pertinent school system information and policies to those students and parents who speak English as a second language. During non-instructional times, staff in the English as a Second Language Department may assist schools in providing such translations. The superintendent may explore additional options for providing translations or interpretations of student and parent policies.

Legal References: No Child Left Behind Act, 20 U.S.C. 6316, 6318; G.S. 115C-36, -47

Cross References: Parental Involvement (policy 1310/4002)

Adopted: January 18, 2011

Use of Digital Media and Resources

Policy Code: 3220 Technology in the Educational Program

The board strives to incorporate the use of technological resources into the educational program in order to enhance instructional opportunities, appeal to different learning styles and meet the educational goals of the board.
Schools are encouraged to develop strategies for using technological resources to improve student success. The strategies should be included in the school improvement plan if they require the transfer of funds or otherwise relate to any mandatory or optional components of the school improvement plan.
The superintendent shall develop a local school system technology plan that is aligned with and meets state requirements and submit the plan to the board for approval. The superintendent shall incorporate this plan into school system strategic planning efforts and shall include various stakeholders such as curriculum leaders, teachers, administrators, representatives from technology services and instructional technology, finance and other departments as required. Once the board has approved the plan, the superintendent shall take all steps necessary to receive approval of the plan from the State Board of Education. No state funds may be spent on any aspect of school technology except in accordance with the technology plan.
The superintendent shall establish relationships with businesses and seek grants and other funding sources in an effort to acquire technological resources for the educational program.

A. SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

All technological resources, including computers, software and communication lines, must be purchased and used in a manner consistent with applicable law and board policy, including laws and policies related to copyright, public records, bidding and other purchase requirements, staff duties and standards for student behavior.

Technological resources must meet or exceed the following standards before they may be considered for implementation.

1. Technological resources must relate to or help to implement the North Carolina Standard Course of Study or the programs of the school system.

2. Technological resources must relate to the current use of learning and instructional management technologies in the school.

3. Technological resources must be compatible with the condition of the network. The technology director shall set minimum standards for technological resources that are purchased or donated. Upgrading, hardware conditions and similar requirements must be maintained to the highest standards.

4. There must be sufficient staff to operate and maintain the technological equipment, programs and systems.

5. There must be adequate funds budgeted to implement and support the technological resources.

B. DEPLOYMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO SCHOOLS

The superintendent shall oversee the development of the school system’s technology deployment plan. The plan will be designed to ensure organized, effective and efficient means of deploying new hardware and software. The superintendent shall develop procedures that outline the strategy of the technology deployment plan.

C. TRAINING FOR USE OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

Users should be trained as necessary in the effective use of technological resources. Such training should include information related to remote access, virus protection, NC WISE, network and information security, and other topics deemed necessary by the superintendent or technology director. School improvement teams should identify any staff development appropriations for technological training in their school improvement plans. The superintendent and technology director should assist schools in coordinating staff development needs as provided in policy 1610/7800, Professional and Staff Development.

Legal References: G.S. 115C-102.6C, -522; 147-33.111; State Board of Education Policy TCS-C-018

Cross References: Professional and Staff Development (policy 1610/7800), Technology Acceptable Use (policy 3225/4312/7320), Copyright Compliance (policy 3230/7330), School Improvement Plan (policy 3430), Integrity and Civility (policy 4310), Public Records – Retention, Release and Disposition (policy 5070/7350), Network Security (policy 6524), Staff Responsibilities (policy 7300), Gifts and Bequests (policy 8220)

Adopted: May 10, 2011

Policy Code: 3225/4312/7320 Technology Acceptable Use
Technological resources, including computers, other electronic devices, programs, networks and the Internet, provide opportunities to enhance instruction, appeal to different learning styles and meet the educational goals of the board. Through the school system’s technological resources, users can observe events as they occur around the world, interact with others on a variety of subjects, and acquire access to current and in-depth information.
Use of technological resources should be integrated into the educational program. Technological resources should be used in teaching the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and in meeting the educational goals of the board. The curriculum committee should provide suggestions for using technological resources in the curriculum guides as provided in policy 3115, Curriculum and Instructional Guides. Teachers are encouraged to further incorporate the use of technological resources into their lesson plans.
The superintendent shall ensure that school system computers with Internet access comply with federal requirements regarding filtering software, Internet monitoring and Internet safety policies. The superintendent shall develop any regulations and submit any certifications necessary to meet such requirements.

A. REQUIREMENTS FOR USE OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

The use of school system technological resources, such as computers and other electronic devices, networks, and the Internet, is a privilege, not a right. Before using the Internet, all students must be trained about appropriate on-line behavior. Such training must cover topics such as cyberbullying and interacting with others on social networking websites and in chat rooms.

Anyone who uses school system computers or electronic devices or who accesses the school network or the Internet at an educational site must comply with the requirements listed below. All students and employees must receive a copy of this policy annually. Before using school system technological resources, students and employees must sign a statement indicating that they understand and will strictly comply with these requirements. Failure to adhere to these requirements will result in disciplinary action, including revocation of user privileges. Willful misuses may result in disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution under applicable state and federal law.

1. School system technological resources are provided for school-related purposes only. Acceptable uses of such technological resources are limited to activities that support learning and teaching. Use of school system technological resources for non-school-related purposes, such as for commercial gain or profit or for political lobbying, is prohibited.

2. Under no circumstance may software purchased by the school system be copied for personal use.

3. Students and employees must comply with all applicable board policies, administrative regulations, and school standards and rules in using technological resources. All applicable laws, including those relating to copyrights and trademarks, confidential information, and public records, apply to technological resource use. Any use that violates state or federal law is strictly prohibited.

4. No user of technological resources, including a person sending or receiving electronic communications, may engage in creating, intentionally accessing, downloading, storing, printing or transmitting images, graphics (including still or moving pictures), sound files, text files, documents, messages or other material that is obscene, defamatory, profane, pornographic, harassing or considered to be harmful to minors.

5. Users of technological resources may not send electronic communications fraudulently (i.e., by misrepresenting the identity of the sender).

6. Users must respect the privacy of others. When using e-mail, chat rooms, blogs or other forms of electronic communication, students must not reveal personally identifiable, private or confidential information, such as the home address or telephone number, of themselves or fellow students. In addition, school employees must not disclose on the Internet or on school system websites or web pages any personally identifiable information concerning students (including names, addresses or pictures) without the written permission of a parent or guardian or an eligible student, except as otherwise permitted by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) or policy 4700, Student Records. Users also may not forward or post personal communications without the author’s prior consent.

7. Users may not intentionally or negligently damage computers, computer systems, electronic devices, software or computer networks. Users may not knowingly or negligently transmit computer viruses or self-replicating messages or deliberately try to degrade or disrupt system performance. Users must scan any downloaded files for viruses.

8. Users may not create or introduce games, network communications programs or any foreign program or software onto any school system computer, electronic device or network without the express permission of the technology director or designee.

9. Users are prohibited from engaging in unauthorized or unlawful activities, such as “hacking” or using the computer network to gain or attempt to gain unauthorized or unlawful access to other computers, computer systems or accounts.

10. Users are prohibited from using or attempting to use another individual’s computer account without written permission from that individual. Users may not read, alter, change, execute or delete files belonging to another user without the owner’s express prior permission.

11. If a user identifies a security problem on a technological resource, he or she must immediately notify a system administrator or the district Internet coordinator. Users must not demonstrate the problem to other users. Any user identified as a security risk will be denied access.

12. Teachers shall make reasonable efforts to supervise a student’s use of the Internet during instructional time.

13. Views may be expressed as representing the view of the school system or part of the school system only with prior approval by the superintendent or designee.

B. RESTRICTED MATERIAL ON THE INTERNET

Before a student may use the Internet for any purpose, the student’s parent must be made aware of the possibility that the student could obtain access to inappropriate material. The parent and student must sign a consent form acknowledging that the student user is responsible for appropriate use of the Internet and consenting to monitoring by school system personnel of the student’s e-mail communication and use of the Internet.

The board is aware that there is information on the Internet that is not related to the educational program. The board also is aware that the Internet may provide information and opportunities to communicate on subjects that are not suitable for school-age children and that many parents would find objectionable. School system personnel shall take reasonable precautions to prevent students from having access to inappropriate materials, such as violence, nudity, obscenity or graphic language that does not serve a legitimate pedagogical purpose. The superintendent shall ensure that the Internet service provider or technology personnel have installed a technology protection measure that blocks or filters Internet access to audio or visual depictions that are obscene, that are considered pornography or that are harmful to minors. School officials may disable such filters for an adult who uses a school-owned computer for bona fide research or another lawful educational purpose. School system personnel may not restrict Internet access to ideas, perspectives or viewpoints if the restriction is motivated solely by disapproval of the ideas involved.

C. PRIVACY

No right of privacy exists in the use of technological resources. School system administrators or individuals designated by the superintendent may review files, monitor all communication, and intercept e-mail messages to maintain system integrity and to ensure compliance with board policy and applicable laws and regulations. School system personnel shall monitor on-line activities of individuals who access the Internet via a school-owned computer.

D. PERSONAL WEBSITES

The superintendent may use any means available to request the removal of personal websites that substantially disrupt the school environment or that utilize school system or individual school names, logos or trademarks without permission.

1. Students

Though school personnel generally do not monitor students’ Internet activity conducted on non-school system computers during non-school hours, when the student’s on-line behavior has a direct and immediate effect on school safety or maintaining order and discipline in the schools, the student may be disciplined in accordance with board policy (see the student behavior policies in the 4300 series).

2. Employees

All employees must use the school system network when communicating with students about any school-related matters. Thus, employees may not use personal websites or on-line networking profiles to post information in an attempt to communicate with students about school-related matters.

Employees are to maintain an appropriate relationship with students at all times. Employees are encouraged to block students from viewing personal information on employee personal websites or on-line networking profiles in order to prevent the possibility that students could view materials that are not age-appropriate. If an employee creates and/or posts inappropriate content on a website or profile and it has a negative impact on the employee’s ability to perform his or her job as it relates to working with students, the employee will be subject to discipline up to and including dismissal. This section applies to all employees, volunteers and student teachers working in the school system.

E. DISCLAIMER

The board makes no warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, for the service it is providing. The school system will not be responsible for any damages suffered by any user. Such damages include, but are not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, mis-deliveries or service interruptions, whether caused by the school system’s or the user’s negligence, errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained via the Internet is at the risk of the user. The school system specifically disclaims any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its Internet services.

Legal References: U.S. Const. amend. I; Children's Internet Protection Act, 47 U.S.C. 254(h)(5); Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2522; Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. 1232g; 17 U.S.C. 101 et seq.; 20 U.S.C. 6777; G.S. 115C-325(e), -391

Cross References: Curriculum and Instructional Guides (policy 3115), Technology in the Educational Program (policy 3220), Copyright Compliance (policy 3230/7330), Web Page Development (3227/7322), Student Behavior Policies (all policies in the 4300 series), Public Records – Retention, Release and Disposition (policy 5070/7350), Use of Equipment, Materials and Supplies (policy 6520), Network Security (policy 6524), Staff Responsibilities (policy 7300)

Adopted: March 8, 2011

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF ROBESON COUNTY

Instructional Use of Videos

Policy Code: 3220 Technology in the Educational Program
The board strives to incorporate the use of technological resources into the educational program in order to enhance instructional opportunities, appeal to different learning styles and meet the educational goals of the board.
Schools are encouraged to develop strategies for using technological resources to improve student success. The strategies should be included in the school improvement plan if they require the transfer of funds or otherwise relate to any mandatory or optional components of the school improvement plan.
The superintendent shall develop a local school system technology plan that is aligned with and meets state requirements and submit the plan to the board for approval. The superintendent shall incorporate this plan into school system strategic planning efforts and shall include various stakeholders such as curriculum leaders, teachers, administrators, representatives from technology services and instructional technology, finance and other departments as required. Once the board has approved the plan, the superintendent shall take all steps necessary to receive approval of the plan from the State Board of Education. No state funds may be spent on any aspect of school technology except in accordance with the technology plan.
The superintendent shall establish relationships with businesses and seek grants and other funding sources in an effort to acquire technological resources for the educational program.

A. SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

All technological resources, including computers, software and communication lines, must be purchased and used in a manner consistent with applicable law and board policy, including laws and policies related to copyright, public records, bidding and other purchase requirements, staff duties and standards for student behavior.

Technological resources must meet or exceed the following standards before they may be considered for implementation.

1. Technological resources must relate to or help to implement the North Carolina Standard Course of Study or the programs of the school system.

2. Technological resources must relate to the current use of learning and instructional management technologies in the school.

3. Technological resources must be compatible with the condition of the network. The technology director shall set minimum standards for technological resources that are purchased or donated. Upgrading, hardware conditions and similar requirements must be maintained to the highest standards.

4. There must be sufficient staff to operate and maintain the technological equipment, programs and systems.

5. There must be adequate funds budgeted to implement and support the technological resources.

B. DEPLOYMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO SCHOOLS

The superintendent shall oversee the development of the school system’s technology deployment plan. The plan will be designed to ensure organized, effective and efficient means of deploying new hardware and software. The superintendent shall develop procedures that outline the strategy of the technology deployment plan.

C. TRAINING FOR USE OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

Users should be trained as necessary in the effective use of technological resources. Such training should include information related to remote access, virus protection, NC WISE, network and information security, and other topics deemed necessary by the superintendent or technology director. School improvement teams should identify any staff development appropriations for technological training in their school improvement plans. The superintendent and technology director should assist schools in coordinating staff development needs as provided in policy 1610/7800, Professional and Staff Development.

Legal References: G.S. 115C-102.6C, -522; 147-33.111; State Board of Education Policy TCS-C-018

Cross References: Professional and Staff Development (policy 1610/7800), Technology Acceptable Use (policy 3225/4312/7320), Copyright Compliance (policy 3230/7330), School Improvement Plan (policy 3430), Integrity and Civility (policy 4310), Public Records – Retention, Release and Disposition (policy 5070/7350), Network Security (policy 6524), Staff Responsibilities (policy 7300), Gifts and Bequests (policy 8220)

Adopted: May 10, 2011

Development of Online Resources

Policy Code: 3100 Curriculum Development
The board recognizes that curriculum development must be an ongoing process in order to address continually the changing needs and diversity of all students and to fulfill the educational goals of the board. The board further recognizes that while educators must be responsible for developing the curriculum, parents, other governmental agencies, businesses and members of the public have valuable insights in the type of curriculum needed.

A. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

The curriculum must be developed to meet state and board requirements, using the North Carolina Standard Course of Study as a foundation. The superintendent shall establish a curriculum committee to coordinate curriculum planning and ensure that the curriculum is aligned with the standard course of study and includes subject-area competencies for each grade level. The committee must include central office administrators, teachers and school administrators representing the various schools and grade levels. Teachers should receive appropriate training so that they may participate in curriculum development. The committee also must seek input from parents, the community and experts in order to make fully informed decisions.

The committee may recommend that the board expand subject areas and objectives of the curriculum to meet the educational goals of the board and state and federal laws. The committee also may recommend eliminating subject areas or objectives that are not state-required or related to the educational goals of the board.

B. CURRICULUM MODIFICATION BY INDIVIDUAL SCHOOLS

The principal is the instructional leader of the school and is responsible for determining whether the curriculum meets the needs of the students of the school. Accordingly, the principal or designee may consider modifying the curriculum.

If a school official wishes to modify the curriculum, he or she may submit a proposal to the central curriculum committee. Unless the curriculum committee has significant concerns about the proposal, the committee will approve the changes so long as the curriculum maintains continuity. After being approved by the curriculum committee, the proposal must be submitted to the board for approval as a part of the school improvement plan process if the modifications include (1) expanding or reducing the subject areas or objectives; (2) eliminating subject areas or objectives not required by the state; or (3) waiving local board policies. The curriculum committee shall ensure that the curriculum continues to be aligned with the standard course of study.

C. EVALUATION

The superintendent shall ensure that the methods for meeting curriculum objectives are regularly evaluated for their effectiveness. The board also encourages external curriculum audits by professional curriculum assessors.


Legal References: G.S. 115C-47, -81


Cross References: Goals and Objectives of the Educational Program (policy 3000), School Improvement Plan (policy 3430)

Adopted: May 10, 2011